Jobs for Ex-pats in Seoul, South Korea

Job opportunities for ex-pats in Seoul, South Korea and jobs in Korea available now, especially English teachers, engineers, etc. South Korean jobs could be a rewarding experience for ex-pats job-seeking for work abroad. There are numerous fields where

There are many jobs for ex-pats in Seoul, South Korea.  Ex-pat jobs in this little corner of Southeast Asia can be found through several different means.  Here are just a few of the places and methods that can turn up some good results for the prospective job hunter.  Two of the best online places to look for job listings in Seoul are learn4good.com and 1stopkorea.com  Both are sites with a reputable track record and many openings from which to choose.

If that doesn't turn up the job you've been looking for you can try alternative methods such as searching blog entries on sites based out of South Korea or other content-rich sites tuned to the topic.  A couple of these are worknplay.co.kr and hiexpat.com who have dedicated some significant efforts to helping ex-pats or job seeking professionals in general.  Finally, if you are an ex-pat who has wondered about working in Asia, or one of the many ex-pats in Asia already, you might find the information below useful in finding a job by understanding the employment arena in Seoul a little bit better.

The South Korean government has a policy of indifference towards job seeking efforts of ex-pats which may not help a prospective job hunter find employment as rapidly as hoped.  Policies like this are designed to give ex-pats less wiggle-room in order to help create wealth and prosperity in Seoul and South Korea at large.  They are remnants of older modes of thought.  Examples of this are their harsh immigration laws.  The government seldom offers jobs directly for ex-pats and it can even be difficult to establish permanent residency.  More information about that can be found in the numerous resources available in the historical record.

The majority of private sector jobs in Seoul can be broken into two seperate areas.  These are English as a Second Language (ESL) jobs, and 3D (dirty, dangerous, and difficult) jobs.  3D jobs present opportunities to those with uniquely specialized skills and/or these interests.  ESL sector work has a tendency towards acceptance and facilitation so may be perfect for social people who need a job quick or in dfferent locations as they move around.  The largest in terms of demand is ESL and presents incentives along with a wide and varied employer base.

Additionally, incentives include programs like free instruction in ESL and policies like tolerance for business owners who invest more than $500,000 dollars into the community; these can help get your foot in the door.  The training programs are offered by companies foreign and domestic and may be able to make your decision easier depending on your inclinations.  Another option for staying in country indefinitely arises for those who put down roots and marry nationalized citizens, though it is hardly an option for the average job seeker.

Once you have narrowed your search and found a few positions you'd like to apply for you can use tools like free certification programs in ESL and training/knowledge of 3D sector skills to do a more detailed and thorough analysis into your options within the job market.  Checking in advance to make sure you are familiar with the rules and customs of the society you will be expected to perform in can also make transitioning more comfortable if you are hired like you hope.

Since the 1970's the workforce demographic has shifted toward an increased need for foreign labor which could open up additional job opportunities.  Policies lightly dictated by the United Nations and other organizations are also opening up the fast growing industrial potential of South Korea as a large scale employment base for workers from abroad.  The traditionally restrictive policies are relaxing and the years to come could see a major restructuring of many of these long held practices.  Throughout the internet are available resources for reading that may give you insight into both the working feasibility of different occupations in South Korea and the rich culture of the residents of Seoul themselves.

Sources:

http://www.urbanophile.com/2011/01/18/erie-expatriates-seeking-jobs%E2%80%A6in-south-korea-by-kristi-gandrud/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immigration_to_South_Korea

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